We Are a certified Cat Friendly Gold Animal Hospital - What Does That Mean?

    We recently received our  Gold Level Cat Friendly Practice  certification from the American Associate of Feline Practitioners ( http://www.catvets.com ). We are really excited to receive this certification-but what does this mean for you and your cats? To become a Cat Friendly Practice, animal hospitals must take very specific steps to assure they understand a cat's unique needs, have implemented feline-friendly standards, and have made changes to decrease stress and provide a more calming environment for your cats.   So why have we done this? Compared to dogs, cats tend to dislike visiting the vet more. However, it is equally important that cats are examined by a veterinarian on a regular basis to prevent and diagnose health issues, as well as regular vaccines, prevention, and more. By implementing cat friendly practices, we are striving to make your cat’s visit easier for you and your cat.  As a Cat Friendly Practice, our clinic incorporates cat-friendly features into the physical environment of the practice including separate cat and dog waiting areas, cat only examination rooms and treatment areas and equipment appropriate specifically for cats. We also regularly use Feliway, a natural pheromone that can lower a cat’s anxiety level.   And most importantly is our staff’s approach to handling your cat. Our staff had received additional training to ensure they remain calm and understand cat’s body language. We use gentle handling techniques to limit the stress of your cat.   Becoming gold certified, requires more then submitting an application. Veterinary clinics that want to become certified feline friendly have to be able to show their hospital is set up appropriately for our feline friends, the staff and veterinarians must receive yearly training that focuses on feline medicine and handling, and be a member of the American Association of Feline Practitioners.   If your cat dislikes coming to the vet, or it is stressful bringing your cat to the vet, come talk to us about ways that we can change this!   Boo Donoho, DVM   

 

We recently received our Gold Level Cat Friendly Practice certification from the American Associate of Feline Practitioners (http://www.catvets.com). We are really excited to receive this certification-but what does this mean for you and your cats? To become a Cat Friendly Practice, animal hospitals must take very specific steps to assure they understand a cat's unique needs, have implemented feline-friendly standards, and have made changes to decrease stress and provide a more calming environment for your cats. 

So why have we done this? Compared to dogs, cats tend to dislike visiting the vet more. However, it is equally important that cats are examined by a veterinarian on a regular basis to prevent and diagnose health issues, as well as regular vaccines, prevention, and more. By implementing cat friendly practices, we are striving to make your cat’s visit easier for you and your cat.

As a Cat Friendly Practice, our clinic incorporates cat-friendly features into the physical environment of the practice including separate cat and dog waiting areas, cat only examination rooms and treatment areas and equipment appropriate specifically for cats. We also regularly use Feliway, a natural pheromone that can lower a cat’s anxiety level. 

And most importantly is our staff’s approach to handling your cat. Our staff had received additional training to ensure they remain calm and understand cat’s body language. We use gentle handling techniques to limit the stress of your cat. 

Becoming gold certified, requires more then submitting an application. Veterinary clinics that want to become certified feline friendly have to be able to show their hospital is set up appropriately for our feline friends, the staff and veterinarians must receive yearly training that focuses on feline medicine and handling, and be a member of the American Association of Feline Practitioners. 

If your cat dislikes coming to the vet, or it is stressful bringing your cat to the vet, come talk to us about ways that we can change this! 

Boo Donoho, DVM